Author Topic: Asthma Chronic Bronchitis Emphysema: Pneumonia: Diseases  (Read 13 times)

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Asthma Chronic Bronchitis Emphysema: Pneumonia: Diseases
« on: August 29, 2016, 06:57:05 pm »
Asthma Chronic Bronchitis Emphysema - Pneumonia - Diseases
What is this condition?  Pneumonia is an acute lung inflammation in which the lungs fill with a fibrous material, impairing gas exchange. With poor gas exchange, the blood has too much carbon dioxide and too little oxygen.

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What are its symptoms?  In the early stage, a person with bacterial pneumonia may have these classic symptoms - coughing, sputum production, chest pain, shaking, chills, and fever.

On examination, the doctor may hear an abnormal breath sound called crackles and discover signs of pleural effusion, abnormal fluid buildup in the lungs. Effusion is responsible for fever, chest pain, shortness of breath, and a nonproductive cough. When doing an assignment on Asthma Chronic Bronchitis Emphysema, it is always better to look up and use matter like the one given here. Your assignment turns out to be more interesting and colorful this way.

People With Normal Lungs and Adequate Immune Defenses Usually Recover Fully
However, pneumonia is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. Learning about things is what we are living here for now. So try to get to know as much about everything, including Bronchitis Emphysema whenever possible.

To prevent a recurrence of pneumonia, don't use antimicrobial drugs during minor viral infections, because this may lead to antibiotic-resistant bacteria in the upper airway. If you then develop pneumonia, you may need to take more toxic drugs to get rid of the orgamsms.

How is It Treated?
Pneumonia is treated with antimicrobial drugs, which vary with the cause of the disease. Humidified oxygen therapy is given if the person has too little oxygen in the blood, and mechanical ventilation is used to treat respiratory failure. Other supportive measures include a high-calorie diet, adequate fluid intake, bed rest, and pain relievers to relieve chest pain. These supportive measures can increase the person's comfort, avoid complications, and speed recovery. To help remove secretions, the person may be taught to cough and perform deep-breathing exercises.

Get yearly flu shots and Pneumovax (pneumococcal vaccine) if you have asthma, chronic bronchitis, emphysema, chronic heart disease, or sickle cell disease.

What can a Person With Pneumonia Do?
" To avoid giving others your infection, dispose of secretions properly. Sneeze and cough into a disposable tissue . People always think that they know everything about everything; however, it should be known that no one is perfect in everything. There is never a limit to learning; even learning about Chronic Bronchitis.

How is It Diagnosed?
The doctor suspects pneumonia if the person has typical symptoms and physical exam results, along with a chest X-ray showing pulmonary infiltrates (abnormal substances in the lungs), and sputum containing acute inflammatory cells. If the person has pleural effusions, the doctor withdraws some fluid from the chest to analyze for signs of infection. Occasionally, the doctor obtains a sample of respiratory airway secretions or inserts an instrument called a bronchoscope into the airway to obtain materials for smear and culture. The person's response to antibiotics also provides important dues to the presence of pneumonia.

Cold flu bronchitis or pneumonia include respiratory failure, pus accumulation in the lungs, and lung abscess. Some people develop a bacterial infection in the blood; if the infection spreads to other parts of the body, it can lead to inflammation of the brain and spinal cord membranes, inflammation of the heart's interior lining, and inflammation of the sac surrounding the heart. The best way of gaining knowledge about Emphysema Chronic Bronchitis is by reading as much about it as possible. This can be best done through the Internet.

Classifying Pneumonia
Pneumonia can be classified by location or type, as well as cause .  " Location: Bronchopneumonia involves the lungs and small airways of the respiratory tract. Lobular pneumonia involves part of a lobe of the lung. Lobar pneumonia involves an entire lobe .

Factors that predispose a person to aspiration pneumonia include old age, debilitation, nasogastric tube feedings, an impaired gag reflex, poor oral hygiene, and a decreased level of consciousness.

What Causes It?
Pneumonia can be caused by a virus, bacterium, fungus, protozoa, mycobacterium, mycoplasma, or rickettsia.  Certain factors can predispose a person to bacterial and viral pneumonia-chronic illness and debilitation, cancer (especially lung cancer), abdominal or chest surgery, atelectasis (the collapse of air sacs in the lung), the flu, common colds or other viral respiratory infections, chronic respiratory disease (such a, emphysema, chronic bronchitis, asthma, bronchiectasis, or cystic fibrosis), smoking, malnutrition, alcoholism, sickle cell disease, tracheostomy, exposure to harmful gases, aspiration, and drugs that suppress the immune system. Never be reluctant to admit that you don't know. There is no one who knows everything. So if you don't know much about Emphysema Chronic Bronchitis Asthma, all that has to be done is to read up on it!

Chronic bronchitis refers to inflammation and infection of the bronchial tubes and mucosal membranes, generating an overproduction of mucus. The excessive production of mucus at the level of the respiratory tract is the body's inflammatory response to irritation and infection of the bronchia. Excess mucus perturbs the process of respiration by reducing the amount of air that is normally received by the lungs. Common symptoms of chronic bronchitis are: mucus-producing cough, difficult breathing, shortness of breath, chest pain and discomfort and wheezing.

Unlike patients who suffer from acute bronchitis, patients with chronic forms of the disease don't respond well to treatments with antibiotics. The excessive production of mucus at the level of the bronchial tubes facilitates the proliferation of bacteria and other infectious organisms, thus contributing to the progression of the disease. On the premises of repeated infections and compromised natural defenses of the respiratory system (cilia barriers), antibiotics are often ineffective in completely overcoming chronic bronchitis. Thus, the treatment of chronic bronchitis is focused towards relieving the already existent symptoms and preventing the development of further complications. Writing is something that has to be done when one is in the mood to write. So when we got in the mood to write about Bronchitis Productive Cough, nothing could stop us from writing!

The incipient stages of the disease, the symptoms of chronic bronchitis are usually perceived in the morning or during the night. In more advanced stages of chronic bronchitis, the entire respiratory tract becomes inflamed and obstructed with mucus, generating intense, persistent cough. This type of recurrent, highly productive cough is commonly referred to as "the smoker's cough". As the disease progresses, chronic bronchitis sufferers also experience pulmonary problems and they are at risk of developing serious lung diseases (pneumonia, emphysema). In time, people with chronic bronchitis may suffer from poor oxygenation of the blood and hypoventilation (shallow, accelerated breathing). Complicated forms of chronic bronchitis may also involve cyanosis as a result of poor oxygenation of the lungs. Cyanosis (bluish aspect of the skin) generally suggests the presence of emphysema or pneumonia. Ignorance is bliss, is it? Isn't it better to learn more than not to know about something like Bronchitis Symptoms. So we have produced this article so that you can learn more about it!

Chronic bronchitis generates recurrent, time-persistent symptoms that intensify as the disease progresses. The main characteristics of chronic bronchitis and cigarette smoking cough, increased susceptibility to bacterial and viral infections of the respiratory tract and low responsiveness to medical treatments. Chronic bronchitis usually lasts for up to three months and regularly reoccurs over the period of two years or more. In present, there is no specific cure for chronic bronchitis. It is rather inviting to go on writing on Bronchitis Patients. however as there is a limitation to the number of words to be written, we have confined ourselves to this. However, do enjoy yourself reading it.

Although smoking alone can't be considered to be the cause of chronic bronchitis, the disease has the highest incidence in regular smokers. Smoking greatly contributes to the proliferation of bacteria and slows down the healing of the respiratory tissues and organs. Chronic bronchitis is often associated with asthma as well. Patients with chronic bronchitis who also suffer from asthma are even less responsive to specific treatments and they commonly experience symptomatic relapse. Sometimes, chronic bronchitis can be the consequence of untreated or mistreated acute bronchitis or other respiratory diseases. Chronic forms of bronchitis can also be developed by people who regularly expose themselves to airborne irritants such as dust, chemicals and pollutants. A rolling stone gathers no moss. So if I just go on writing, and you don't understand, then it is of no use of me writing about Chronic Bronchitis Mucus! Whatever written should be understandable by the reader.

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